Award-winning Tokyo-based Ginza Sushi Ichi Relocates Its Singapore Outlet to Marriott Tang Plaza Hotel at Orchard

Sushi Ichi Singapore, a branch of the award-wining Tokyo-based Ginza Sushi Ichi has recently relocated from its former location at Scotts Square to Singapore Marriott Tang Plaza Hotel in Orchard, continuing to build on edomae style sushi with revamps to the menu by Executive Head Chef Masakazu Ishibashi.

Sushi Ichi Singapore at Marriott Tang Plaza Hotel in Orchard

Sushi Ichi Singapore - Marriott Tang Plaza Hotel Orchard - Review by Gourmet Adventures

Edomae: A traditional style of sushi making in the 1800s where Chefs would use a variety of seafood preservation methods such as aging, marinating, salting, as well as boiling and grilling.

“‘Edo’ is the old name for Tokyo, and ‘mae’ means in front of and combined, it refers to the use of seafood caught from Tokyo Bay.” says Chef Masa. “Edomae style sushi is deeply associated with seasonality because what was served was dependent on what the fishermen were able to catch. It was also often considered a type of fast food for the busy working crowd.”

At the intimate 23-seater restaurant, Chef Masa showcases edomae style sushi through the aging of fish, a process that involves careful cleaning and treating of fish before storing it in the restaurant’s special chillers – only 20 of traditional fridges exist in the world, and cost around $20,000 each.

Sushi Ichi Singapore receives daily shipments of fish. Says Chef Masa, “Most think that fresh fish tastes better, but waiting for a while gives the fish better texture for sushi – some fish may be too tough when fresh.”

Aging tuna at Sushi Ichi Singapore

Sushi Ichi Singapore - Aging Tuna - Review by Gourmet Adventures

Apart from aging fish, we learn that rice can be aged as well. Certain dishes speak of patience – incorporating Akitakomachi sushi from the Yamagata prefecture aged for a year to remove moisture and reduce starchiness, resulting in rice that is not too sticky and dry. It is then seasoned with white, or a mixture of red and white vinegar, depending on the type of seafood it is paired with.

Chef Masa preparing ika (squid) sushi at Sushi Ichi Singapore

Sushi Ichi Singapore - Chef Masakazu Ishibashi making sushi - Review by Gourmet Adventures

Here, we sample Chef Masa’s interpretation of edomae style sushi – ika (squid) sushi, made with sushi rice seasoned with both types, concluding that a mixture of red and white vinegar subtly enhances the rice without stealing the show – perfect for oily fish such as aged tuna, while sushi rice seasoned with white vinegar showcases a more robust flavor – best paired with milder seafood like squid.

Ika (squid) sushi at Sushi Ichi Singapore (from left: sushi rice seasoned with white vinegar; sushi rice seasoned with a mixture of red and white vinegar)

Sushi Ichi Singapore - Ika Sushi - Review by Gourmet Adventures

Uni sushi at Sushi Ichi Singapore

Sushi Ichi Singapore - Uni Sushi - Review by Gourmet Adventures

New additions to the menu include mushi awabi (steamed abalone; part of its $450 dinner omakase) from the Chiba prefecture – steamed for six hours in a combination of salt, seaweed, konbu and sake until tender. On its own, the abalone is luscious and full of sweet, briny flavors of the sea – its texture and tenacity, perfectly robust. A mixture of miso, soy and abalone liver sauce is then drizzled over to unleash its full umami flavor – complementing its perfect balance of density and texture.

Abalone from Chiba prefecture at Sushi Ichi Singapore

Sushi Ichi Singapore - Abalone from Chiba prefecture - Review by Gourmet Adventures

Chef Masa preparing mushi awabi (steamed abalone) at Sushi Ichi Singapore

Sushi Ichi Singapore - Chef Masakazu Ishibashi preparing abalone - Review by Gourmet Adventures

Mushi awabi (steamed abalone; part of its $450 dinner omakase) at Sushi Ichi Singapore

Sushi Ichi Singapore - Signature Mushi Awabi (Steamed Abalone) - Review by Gourmet Adventures

Another signature of Chef Masa is the kegani (hairy crab; part of its $450 dinner omakase), embodying mottainai, where every part of the crab is carefully utilized to prevent wastage. At Sushi Ichi Singapore, the kegani is served as a trio: crab risotto on its own, with ikura (salmon roe), and additionally with more uni (sea urchin).

Kegani (hairy crab) at Sushi Ichi Singapore

Sushi Ichi Singapore - Kegani, Hairy Crab - Review by Gourmet Adventures

Sushi Ichi Singapore - Signature Kegani (Hairy Crab) - Review by Gourmet Adventures

Kegani trio (hairy crab; part of its $450 dinner omakase) at Sushi Ichi Singapore

Sushi Ichi Singapore - Signature Kegani (Hairy Crab) Trio - Review by Gourmet Adventures

Having spent his entire life immersed in the art of sushi making explains the generous quality of Chef Masa’s dishes. The crab risotto is made by mixing sushi rice with boiled Hokkaido crab meat and steamed in its shell, served with an expressive vinegar and bonito sauce. Decadence is supported by pearls of ikura, further enhanced by a plump piece of fresh uni that majestically crowns the dish.

Kegani with ikura and uni at Sushi Ichi Singapore

Sushi Ichi Singapore - Signature Kegani (Hairy Crab) with Ikura and Uni - Review by Gourmet Adventures

Says Chef Masa, “Coming to Sushi Ichi is like coming to watch a performance, where our chefs are the ‘actors’ – combining the sound of cooking with precise movements. Our Chefs are trained to engage with guests, and connect them to understanding the food so that it becomes a transformative dining experience.”

Lunch ranges from $70 to $240 (omakase), while dinner ranges from $220 (omakase).

Read Chef Masa’s tips on the art of sushi making here.

Sushi Ichi Singapore, #01-04 Singapore Marriott Tang Plaza Hotel, 320 Orchard Rd., 6235-5514. Open Tue-Sat noon-2:30pm; 6-11pm, Sun 6-10pm.

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Categories: Dining, Fine Dining, Hotel Dining, Japanese, New & Noted, Omakase Menus, Restaurants, Reviews

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. In the Kitchen: Chef Masakazu Ishibashi of Sushi Ichi Singapore | GOURMET ADVENTURES - December 7, 2015

    […] Read our review on Sushi Ichi Singapore here. […]

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